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Whose Problem Is It? - Scott Adams' Blog

Whose Problem Is It?

When people tell me their problems, I immediately feel like I need to solve them. I wonder if that impulse is an American cultural thing. Obviously every individual is different, but it seems as if we Americans like to get involved in other people’s business.

I think about that impulse when I noodle about the North Korean situation. Realistically, is there anything the United States can do to influence North Korea that China isn’t already doing in its own self interest? North Korea is dependent on China for its survival, and China’s economy is dependent on avoiding nuclear wars anywhere in the world. China is smart and competent. Isn’t the North Korean nuclear threat China’s problem to solve?

We all agree that if North Korea sells nukes to rogue regimes, it’s bad for the United States. But can we really do anything about it that China isn’t already doing in pursuit of its own self interest? I doubt it.

China will use economics to move from their already strong influence over North Korea to something that will be closer to total control. And my guess is that the generals in North Korea are already the real power, with the Dear Leader as their bumbling figurehead. I doubt the country’s real leadership is as crazy as it seems.

The current issue of Newsweek claims North Korea’s economy is actually stable and growing, with plenty of natural materials to exploit. With China’s help, North Korea’s economy could be booming in a few years, mostly because of mining. For the ruling elite, that would make the selling of nuclear secrets less profitable than good ol’ Russia-style domestic corruption, and far riskier.

My entire knowledge of international affairs is based on several one-day visits to Canada and four days napping on a beach in Cancun. My views on North Korea, and most other topics, can be safely ignored. I’m just curious whether our cultural bias is causing us to rationalize meddling in North Korea.